Glossy White Platform Bed Restoration

29 Mar

When we first moved to LA, we weren’t certain if the move would be permanent.  So we bought some extremely cheap “temporary” furniture.

Extremely Cheap = secondhand beat up iKea furniture we found on craigslist.

Well one night our second hand bedframe broke.  We were peacefully sleeping and the bed suddenly came crashing to the floor while dreaming.  I thought it was an earthquake.   Let me tell you, it’s not a great way to wake up.

So we threw away the broken bed frame and actually slept like this for two months.  Embarrassing I know.  We’re lazy.  There’s our nice Tempur-pedic mattress just slumming it on the floor.

Arnold obviously had no problem with it.  His short little legs could easily jump on the bed much easier.

As much as Arnold rules the house, we needed to raise the bed off the floor.

I wanted to find an old interesting wood bed to restore – and searched and searched for the perfect bed but couldn’t find anything to work in our room, especially because we were limited to a platform frame… and an Eastern size king.  Most people have California kings which are longer, our Eastern is wider.

I could never find the perfect one but I did find a suitable match that will work for now. It is an Eastern King and quite possibly a West Elm?  It was very dirty and scratched up but only cost $75 and for a solid wood platform bed, it was a steal.  Honestly, after two months I probably would have paid millions not to be sleeping on the floor anymore.

So I cleaned and cleaned this filthy sucker.

Then sanded away all the chips and scrapes with a sanding pad.

I wanted a bright white paint.  Real pure white.  No hints of green, gray or any other shade.  All the leftover paint in my garage wasn’t pure white and I didn’t want to go buy new gallon since only a small amount was required— so I used the white epoxy paint leftover from my garage renovation.

It was perfect.  Solid pure white and glossy.

Next I finished it off with wet-gloss also leftover from my garage epoxy project.  Also perfect.

Neither the acrylic paint or the wet-look gloss were designed to paint a furniture but if they can adhere to concrete and be durable enough to withstand cars driving on it, we figure it can handle our mattress and Arnold.

We still need to decorate and do much much more, but the white bed frame is a good start and contrasts well with our dark espresso floors.

It has been a few months and the epoxy paint and gloss have held up very well.  Durable and thick.  And glossy glossy!

Check out these fun blogs for amazing inspiration!

Between Naps on the PorchDIY ShowoffDomestically SpeakingFinding FabulousFunky Junk InteriorsHouse of HepworthsMiss Mustard SeedMy Backyard EdenPerfectly ImperfectPrimitive & ProperRemodelaholicSAS InteriorsShabby NestWhipperberry,Today’s Creative BlogThe Thrifty HomeSavvy Southern StyleSome Day CraftsEisy MorganGreen Door Designs,  At Home with K,Home Stories A2Z

 

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20 Responses to “Glossy White Platform Bed Restoration”

  1. my beautiful life April 16, 2011 at 12:05 pm #

    Necessity is the mother of invention. What a gorgeous bed frame-you did an awesome job, and were incredibly resourceful. Love this project.

  2. Jennifer Juniper May 18, 2011 at 6:17 am #

    I love that you used what you had on hand! It really turned out great :)

  3. telisa May 18, 2011 at 10:32 am #

    genius!! i would LOVE to do this. . . our new bed is still sitting on the floor after a year.

  4. Cassie At Primitive & Proper May 18, 2011 at 6:07 pm #

    that is so beautiful and modern! love it!

  5. Laura May 19, 2011 at 6:20 am #

    What a beautiful bed! Thanks for linking up to Laugh, Love, and Craft’s Share the Wealth Wednesday Link Party! Laura

  6. Saved By Love Creations May 19, 2011 at 3:34 pm #

    Great job! Glad you stopped by Thrifty Thursday. Blessings…

  7. Leslie May 19, 2011 at 5:28 pm #

    I am inspired by the pure white! I never thought it could work, but you have proven me wrong. I love it! Thank you for sharing!

  8. Just Jaime May 21, 2011 at 3:28 pm #

    Looks great! Great job cleaning it up!

  9. Courtney May 23, 2011 at 5:03 pm #

    Wonderful! I love the white- and your sweet pup is darling! Thank you for sharing this at FNF this week! :)

  10. adventuresindinner June 23, 2011 at 10:39 am #

    Fab! Is the pup still fairly happy? :)

  11. Jami July 19, 2011 at 5:54 pm #

    Gorgeous update! The bed looks especially good with your adorable model on it!
    Thanks so much for linking to the Tuesday To Do Party!
    Smiles!
    Jami

  12. SJ @ Homemaker On A Dime July 21, 2011 at 6:35 pm #

    I’m so grateful that you linked up in this week’s Creative Bloggers’ Party & Hop :) This awesome post totally rocked the party!

  13. Deborah July 22, 2011 at 2:15 pm #

    Oooohhh la LA!!!

  14. abeachcottage July 24, 2011 at 3:10 am #

    Great job! Love the glossy, glossy white look

  15. Ziba Anne July 25, 2011 at 5:52 am #

    Wonderful job, great to see the step by step details. Isn’t Behr paint just the best…

  16. miss bliss July 30, 2011 at 1:06 am #

    Love it– it came out great!

    would love your input on my impending redo :)

    http://chocolateshoesandcoffee.blogspot.com/2011/07/repurposing-your-vote-on-color.html

  17. Piedad Tobia November 29, 2012 at 12:20 am #

    We always have brass bed frames at home and they are really nice. :

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  18. Shanell Loudon March 11, 2013 at 6:02 am #

    Iron beds are beds in which the headboard and footboard are made of iron; the frame rails are usually made of steel. Iron beds were developed in 17th century Italy to address concerns about infestation by bed bugs and moths. An iron cradle (with dangerously pointed corner posts) has been dated to 1620-1640.[4] From the start of their production in the 1850s until World War I, iron beds were handmade. The manufacturing process included hand pouring and polishing intricately detailed casting and hand applying finishes. In the many small foundries of the time that employed only a handful of employees, it could take days to produce a single bed. `

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