What’s for Dinner :: Grilled Asparagus and Feta

11 Jan

I found this recipe while searching for meatless meal ideas….that’s another story coming soon.

I email it to my friend and simply wrote:

Get. In. My. Belly

Her response:

Make me some now!

Ha!  Love that girl!

Sunday night dinner consisted of homemade sweet potato fries, grilled asparagus with feta…and a big steak.

I couldn’t touch the steak with a 10 foot pole.  Again, more on that soon.

Easiest recipe ever.

Grilled Asparagus with Feta 

1 large bunch fresh asparagus, washed and stems trimmed

2 T olive oil

Crumbled Feta cheese (which should be its own food group, just sayin)

Fresh lemon juice

Salt and pepper to taste

Toss asparagus with olive oil, salt and pepper.  I could eat it raw just like this.

Throw on a hot grill for about 7-9 minutes

Cut into 2 inch bites, toss with feta and a squeeze of fresh lemon juice.

You won’t be disappointed.

Happy Wednesday, friends!

Carrie

 

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3 Responses to “What’s for Dinner :: Grilled Asparagus and Feta”

  1. Johnny Mullenax October 30, 2012 at 10:10 pm #

    Asparagus is not only tasty but it is also rich in vitamins and minerals. ;

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  2. Sarai Logie February 19, 2013 at 4:33 pm #

    One more benefit of asparagus: It contains high levels of the amino acid asparagine, which serves as a natural diuretic, and increased urination not only releases fluid but helps rid the body of excess salts. This is especially beneficial for people who suffer from edema (an accumulation of fluids in the body’s tissues) and those who have high blood pressure or other heart-related diseases. .

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  3. Sydney Ostberg May 30, 2013 at 5:46 pm #

    Asparagus has been used as a vegetable and medicine, owing to its delicate flavour, diuretic properties, and more. It is pictured as an offering on an Egyptian frieze dating to 3000 BC. Still in ancient times, it was known in Syria and in Spain. Greeks and Romans ate it fresh when in season and dried the vegetable for use in winter.-”:’

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